Can you contract hiv through oral sex

Duration: 4min 15sec Views: 1186 Submitted: 26.06.2020
Category: Trans With Guy
Many people find oral sex an intensely pleasurable experience. People use different terms to refer to oral sex including formal terms like fellatio and cunnilingus and slang terms like blow jobs and giving head. Usually oral sex means one person kissing, licking or sucking another person's genitals. Doctors and researchers can't be sure how many people have acquired HIV through oral sex.

What Is the Risk of HIV from Oral Sex?

HIV from oral sex: Possibility, risks, and prevention

The chances of transmitting HIV through oral sex are very low. A person can still take preventive measures, such as by using a condom. HIV spreads through some bodily fluids. The virus can pass through direct contact with fluid or through sharing syringes. In this article, we describe the transmission of HIV through oral sex and give some tips for prevention. However, it might happen if someone with HIV ejaculates into the mouth of a sexual partner. Antiretroviral medications reduce the number of viral cells in the body, which can eventually result in an undetectable viral load.

Can You Get HIV from Oral Sex?

New savings and lower costs for health coverage is now available at HealthCare. You can also use other HIV prevention methods, below. If you have HIV , the most important thing you can do to prevent transmission and stay healthy is to take your HIV medicine known as antiretroviral therapy or ART , every day, exactly as prescribed.
As the risk of transmission through oral sex is estimated to be much lower than for vaginal and anal intercourse in the absence of antiretroviral therapy, it is implausible that the risk of transmission through oral sex is not affected in the same way as other sexual transmission risks when effective treatment suppresses viral load. When HIV is not fully supressed, the risk of HIV transmission through the mouth is certainly smaller than through vaginal or anal intercourse. If undamaged, the tissues of the mouth and throat are thought to be less susceptible to infection than genital or anal tissues, and an enzyme in saliva also acts to inhibit HIV. Very few cases of transmission through oral sex have been reported amongst gay men despite the continued practice of oral sex often with ejaculation into the mouth by large numbers of men over many years. There are no reliable reports of HIV being transmitted from the mouth to the genitals.